DESIGNING THE BATTLE – THE ATTACK

Written by Jesse Bergman


When Numbers Collide

Attacking in card games is the primary damage mechanic.  Combat in general is where most of a game’s interaction really occurs.  This isn’t always the case though. Certain deck designs may purposefully avoid combat in favor of direct damage or tricks to defeat your opponent.  While tricks may be good for kids, we are going to talk about the meat and potatoes, combat.

There are two different types of attacks in Battle for Sularia.  Both are effective and both can be leveraged to defeat opponents and control their board.  The first is a traditional attack.  In a traditional attack we have one target attacker to one target defender.  Usually, this is one combatant (attacker) against one defender (site). However, there are times that an opponent may throw their own combatant in to the fray as an additional defender to try and save their site. While I don’t want to dive too deep into the interaction, the picture below depicts both of these circumstances.

Example A:

Example A: Combatant A is attacking Site A controlled by his opponent.  Combatant A’s attack value of 5 is high enough to exceed Site A’s Defense value of 3.  This combat would resolve in Site A being placed in the damage pile and Combatant A would survive the exchange. In Addition the player controlling Site A would take an additional 2 points of health loss from the unabsorbed attack value of Combatant A. The player who controls Site A also loses 4 health due to the Influence cost of the site.

Example A: Combatant A is attacking Site A controlled by his opponent.  Combatant A’s attack value of 5 is high enough to exceed Site A’s Defense value of 3.  This combat would resolve in Site A being placed in the damage pile and Combatant A would survive the exchange. In Addition the player controlling Site A would take an additional 2 points of health loss from the unabsorbed attack value of Combatant A. The player who controls Site A also loses 4 health due to the Influence cost of the site.

Example B:

Example B: Example B shows the exact same interaction from Combatant A and Site A, but we’ve added Combatant B, controlled by the opponent, to the defense of Site A.  Combatant B literally defends Combatant A. Combatant B’s defense value cannot absorb all 5 Attack Value from Combatant A and Combatant A’s remaining 3 attack value points transfer into Site A.  However the Attack Value of Combatant B and Site A is enough damage to also take out Combatant A. Because the attack value of Combatant A is high enough to damage both Combatant B and Site A, the player controlling Site A will lose 4 health based on the Influence cost of Site A.

Example B: Example B shows the exact same interaction from Combatant A and Site A, but we’ve added Combatant B, controlled by the opponent, to the defense of Site A.  Combatant B literally defends Combatant A. Combatant B’s defense value cannot absorb all 5 Attack Value from Combatant A and Combatant A’s remaining 3 attack value points transfer into Site A.  However the Attack Value of Combatant B and Site A is enough damage to also take out Combatant A. Because the attack value of Combatant A is high enough to damage both Combatant B and Site A, the player controlling Site A will lose 4 health based on the Influence cost of Site A.

The Joint Strike Force:

The second, more complex, type of attack is a Joint Strike Force, or JSF.  In a JSF the attacking player combines his combatants to target a single site.  There are many times where this is the more advantageous way to approach defeating your opponent, therefore JSF attacking is the main attack process. A JSF can be two or more combatants, and multiple Joint Strike Force attacks can occur during a single attack phase.  This is the primary way to get big damage through to an opponent directly.  The following two examples show an undefended JSF, and a defended JSF.

Example C:

Example C: In example C a player is attacking with Combatant A & B, into Site A.  This qualifies as a Joint Strike Force.  Since the player with Site A is not adding a Defender into the attack then Combatant A & Combatant B both deal 5 attack value into the defense value of Site A.  Since Site A has a defense value of 9 and Combatant A & B have a combined Attack Value of 10 then the player controlling Site A will take one additional loss of health as well as lose 4 health from the influence cost of Site A.

Example C: In example C a player is attacking with Combatant A & B, into Site A.  This qualifies as a Joint Strike Force.  Since the player with Site A is not adding a Defender into the attack then Combatant A & Combatant B both deal 5 attack value into the defense value of Site A.  Since Site A has a defense value of 9 and Combatant A & B have a combined Attack Value of 10 then the player controlling Site A will take one additional loss of health as well as lose 4 health from the influence cost of Site A.

 Example D:

Example D: In Example D the player controlling Site A has added a Defender, Combatant C.  When a defender is added in a Joint Strike Force, that defender may only defend one combatant attacking.  In this case Combatant C is defending Combatant A.  When this attack resolves, Combatant A deals 5 points of attack value to combatant C; which is one point higher than the defense value of Combatant C.  This one point passes through to Site A.  With combatant B having an attack value of 5 the total amount of damage taken by Site A is 6 which does not exceed the defense value of Site A.  Combatant C deals 4 points of Attack value back to Combatant A due to being directly defended.  The remaining point of Attack value is distributed into either Combatant A or Combatant B.  Site damage is distributed at the choice of the player controlling Combatant A & B.  In this instance Combatant B will absorb the one point of damage.

Example D: In Example D the player controlling Site A has added a Defender, Combatant C.  When a defender is added in a Joint Strike Force, that defender may only defend one combatant attacking.  In this case Combatant C is defending Combatant A.  When this attack resolves, Combatant A deals 5 points of attack value to combatant C; which is one point higher than the defense value of Combatant C.  This one point passes through to Site A.  With combatant B having an attack value of 5 the total amount of damage taken by Site A is 6 which does not exceed the defense value of Site A.  Combatant C deals 4 points of Attack value back to Combatant A due to being directly defended.  The remaining point of Attack value is distributed into either Combatant A or Combatant B.  Site damage is distributed at the choice of the player controlling Combatant A & B.  In this instance Combatant B will absorb the one point of damage.

As you can see combining your attackers into the same Site can provide you with a much larger impact to the health of your opponent. However, you always have to be on the lookout for a potential defender derailing your Joint Strike Force.

Next week we’ll discuss the command chain and its resolution.  Until next time, get out and find a demo of Battle for Sularia!